4 Quick Tips to Pass the GED Test

People who are not able to complete high school have another chance to get a certification that’s equivalent to a high school diploma-by passing the GED test.

The GED test is the only high school certification program that’s recognized in all 50 states, according to GED Testing Service. It gives individuals who are least 16 years old and are not enrolled in high school a second chance to get their high school certification.

Some people are not able to complete high school for various reasons. It can be because they decided to drop out and pursue other things, it can be due to financial or health setbacks, or it can be because they have migrated from another country and their education credentials are not recognized in the US. The GED test gives these people the chance to have their high school diploma, which they can use to apply for college or to land better jobs. All they need to do is to pass the test, which covers four subjects: language arts, mathematics, history, and science.

How to Pass the GED Test

1. Know the scope of the test.

The first thing you need to do when preparing for the GED exam is to know the topics covered. Get access to a GED study guide, which tells you the coverage of the exam, how many minutes you will be given to complete the test, and the types of questions you will find in the test. This will help you save time by studying only what’s included in the actual test.

2. Assess your skill level.

After determining the scope of the test, check your skill level. Evaluate your current knowledge and skills. Doing so will help you determine which areas you need to focus on. For example, if you are weak in algebra, then you should focus on studying the subject and its components, such as solving rational equations or performing operations on polynomials.

3. Practice.

After studying, the key to retaining the information you’ve learned and ensure you have a good understanding of the topic is to take mock tests. Practice tests are offered on GED preparation websites. Practicing your skills solidifies what you have learned from studying.

4. Prepare your body, too.

When preparing for the GED, you don’t just prepare your mind, but also your body. Get 7 to 9 hours of sleep to enhance your memory. Lack of sleep dims your memory and weakens your ability to focus. Exercise to improve circulation, which delivers the oxygen and nutrient-rich blood to your brain. Eating brain-boosting foods like broccoli and blueberries will also help.

The key to passing the GED test and any exam is thorough planning and preparation. Thorough planning here means studying with a purpose. Instead of mindlessly going through every subject, focus only on the included topics, especially your weak areas. Commit to a study plan and schedule.

IELTS Reading Tips

Reading tips

Never read the passage first

Never waste your time at reading the passage first. There are so many people who read the passage first and they end up answering not more than 5 questions in a paragraph. You have a better chance of finding the answers if you read the questions first and then read the passage. The reading passage is not going to judge your common sense that means that you might think that smoking is bad for health, but what if the passage has been written by a smoker. You will should not rely on your knowledge to answer the questions on the contrary you should only rely on the reading passage for your answers as it is the place from where you are supposed to find the answers.

Read each question 4 times

You should try to read each question 4 times rather than reading each paragraph 4 times. If you can find understand the keywords present in the question, there is a high probability that you will find the answer quickly and easily.

Circle the nouns and underline the verbs

The good thing about the IELTS exam is that you can do all the rough work on the question as it is the not the paper which is going to be graded. You will have to transfer your answers to the answer sheet and that is the sheet which is going to be graded. You can circle the nouns and underline the verbs which are present in the questions. This not necessary to do, but it will greatly improve your process of finding the keywords.

Skimming and scanning

I know you guys might have heard a lot about skimming and scanning and now is the time when you will understand what it really is. Skimming and scanning is technique by which you find the keywords in the passage without the actually reading the passage. You will only start reading the passage once you have found the keywords and you will actually find the answers quite easily.

Similar words

This is a very important skill which you need to develop in order to answer the questions correctly. People cannot find the words because either do not know the meaning of the word or they do not know the similar word of a certain word.

Vocabulary words

Some people can find the words easily, but they find great difficulty in understanding the words. The most difficult task for a person is to understand the complex words. There is no point of finding the keywords if you cannot understand them. That is the reasoning I have been stressing on the point that people who have very poor English cannot get their desired band because they would not even be able to apply the tips and techniques.

Nouns and verbs should agree

This sentence means that you should always expect to find the keywords in the same sentence. You might not find the exact word in the passage, but you will definitely find the similar words for those keywords. There is a very high change that you would find all the information in the topic sentence. Topic is sentence is either the first or last sentence of a word.

2 lines above and below

If you have found the keyword, you have done a very good job. Do not give away the question with a small mistake. Always read the 2 line and above and below the sentence which contains the keyword, so that you could see whether they are trying to confuse you or not.

Suppose this is a statement in the exam and you are told to tell whether the statement is True, False or Not Given.

I used to drive the car which was of black color, however now I go for public transport.

What do you think would be the answer to this question.

True, False and Not Given

Original Statement: The Chinese Government spent $15 billion on health facilities.

$15 billion was spent on the health facilities by the Chinese officials. (T)

Chinese Government will spend $15 billion on the health facilities. (F)

Chinese semi-government organization has spent $15 billion on health facilities. (N.G)

People of China are not happy with the government for spending so much on the health facilities. (N.G)

Chinese government paid $15 billion for health sector. (T)

Chinese government spent $14 billion for health facilities. (F)

5 Tips to Buy Children’s Apps

With the festival season not very far away, many children are about to receive electronic gifts from their family and relatives. The good news is that apps have emerged as a promising tool to support literacy in general, and science, mathematics and life skills. The challenge for parents is to pick up the right app, more so, if the child has autism spectrum disorder or has special needs.

#1 The education and entertainment combo

Kids learn when they’re engaged. Educational apps like Just Match or Math on the Farm forge a perfect balance between learning and engagement. The Math on the Farm app teaches mathematics skills in a fun way. Here, the child has to answer multiple-choice type questions to score points. The stories in the app are themed on a farm that has flowers, vegetables, domestic animals, and cattle. Bright colors and interactive animation are the highlights of this app. It’s important that the child learns by playing and the Math on the Farm app does just that.

#2 Play with your child

Studies have shown that children learn better if parents join the fun. Take an active role and choose and app that’s likely to hold your kid’s attention. The Just Match app could be perfect for you. This fun educational app teaches matching skills, where you’ll be shown to game figures and an outline which matches only one of them. You’ve to drag and match the figure with the outline. A lively animation will hail your efforts every time you match correctly.

#3 Select appropriate games

Determine whether a fun educational app is correct for your child. Not all four-year old will be equal. So, different apps would appeal to different kids at different times. Ask yourself whether your child will be able to follow the app’s storyline. The touch screen system is a major advancement in the field of communication. Make sure the fun educational app has audio cues and not only words.

#4 Set limits and encourage other playing and learning forms

Well, setting the proper “media diet” is important for your child. It’s almost like balanced food. The more variety, the better it’s for your child. Consider the number of hours the child will spend in front of a screen. A possible rule could be not allowing TV until the homework is complete. The same should apply to a touch screen, unless it’s required in school, which of course is increasingly happening these days.

#5 Download from reliable, trusted sources

Look for established brands that specialize in fun educational apps. Are you comfortable with the app’s characters? Kids imitate popular media characters. Make sure the language and behavior in fun educational apps are appropriate for your kids. Avoid apps that have a lot of violence or are frightening to play. Such apps may have an adverse impact on the child’s mind. The Math on the Farm and Just Match app can fit the bill perfectly. These two apps are sensitive to children’s needs, and are among the best fun educational apps around.

Fast Track Ivy League Admissions Tips

The Ivy League is an athletic union of American educational institutes based in the north-east of The States including Harvard, Yale and Columbia University. Many people mistakenly believe MIT and Stanford are members of this union. While we reference these institutes in this article, they are not.

There are a series of factors that will determine your acceptance to the Ivy League or other elite institutes. Here we’ll analyse the best approach. Let’s begin with your GPA.

GPA Requirements

Of course, your GPA is a pillar of your application. But is your application a house of cards without it? Not necessarily. Why is it that some students with 4.0 GPA’s are rejected, while others with sub-3 GPA’s are accepted? Because the value of the courses you took is often of equal value to your result. Because your application needs to demonstrate extra-curricular pedigree.

Your record at school needs to display academic rigor – don’t opt for the easiest courses. A prescribed high school path featuring 4 years of the cornerstone subjects, English, Math and Science, are best complimented with 4 years dedicated to History and learning a foreign language.

That brings us on to Extra-Curriculars.

Those Darn Extra-Curriculars

Meet John. John has a 2.7 grade point average and equally unremarkable SAT results. Although John was never the best student, he excelled in sports, holding the post as captain for his Baseball, Basketball and Football teams, winning awards for his sporting ability. It’s these strengths that secured his place at Harvard. Meanwhile many thousands of students are rejected every year with outstanding academics.

Stories of a sub-3 GPA turned Harvard graduate are the exception, but there’s a moral to this tale. If two students are equal academically, universities like employers, will opt for the candidate who has held leadership roles or displayed an extra-curricular spike. Without these traits, your application will be lost.

Financial Aid

Unfortunately, you’ll have to factor cost into attending your dream school. Fortunately, though, the world’s most prestigious schools are often in possession of the largest financial aid endowments. Consider Harvard which has a financial aid budget of $172,000,000. This aid is reserved for students whose parents are earning under $60,000 per year. The net result means the cost of attending actually matches or bests 90% of other universities. Before preparing your FAFSA application (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), you’ll need to know where you stand.

What About Reach Schools?

Universities with low admissions rates, including Harvard and Yale are considered ‘Reach Schools’. A ‘Match School’ is one that has a high probability of acceptance. Identifying reach schools and match schools is smart forward planning.

Perhaps your heart is set on attending Yale. You may dream of being published in Yale Law Review before one day running for Congress. Students negotiate a path towards their dreams every year. Equally there are who students fail to reach the school of their dreams without Plan B. Identify other institutes with a prestigious record of graduating the finest minds in your field.

Post-Graduate Success

When creating a shortlist of schools, it’s wise to assess the post-graduate success student’s are likely to experience. Let’s take MIT. While the US economy struggles and jobs are scare, MIT bucks the trend. Studies demonstrate just 20% of students find employment on graduation. MIT students however, fare better than the national average with on-campus hiring still prevalent.

The idea that your post-graduate success is purely dependent on your education, however, is mistaken. History is shaped by those who defy the rules and define their own route. Be they a Harvard reject Warren Buffet or Princeton reject Ted Turner. So, you don’t need to graduate the Ivy League to be a success… But it helps.

USC Pharmacy School Application Requirements and Tips From an Accepted Student

I will begin with the statistics of the accepted students into the University of Southern California Doctor of Pharmacy program for 2009. 460 students were offered interviews from a pool of over 2000 applicants. 240 students are accepted (11 students from out-of-state schools), and the expected class size for 2009 is 190. One must note that USC offers their undergraduates the opportunity of guaranteed admission as long as they complete their requirements in the TAP program (these students take up a large chunk of seats available for other applicants).

Obtaining a Bachelor’s degree is now a requirement for admission at USC. The minimum GPA requirement is a 3.0 (the average GPA of accepted students is a 3.60). Since USC does not require taking the PCAT, other admission criteria is weighed more heavily (GPA, interview performance, extracurricular activities, personal statements, etc.).

For the application process, it is very important for you to note that the University of Southern California sends out interview invitations on a rolling basis, so it is important that you turn in your PharmCAS application and supplemental application as soon as possible. The deadlines for both are early November, but I highly recommend that you turn both in no latter than early August (I turned in my applications by mid-July, just 1.5 months after the application was made available).

At your interview, you will be asked questions by a current pharmacy school student as well as a faculty member. Think of it more of a conversation where you also ask questions back to both of them. When you first arrive at the interview session, you will be greeted by several current pharmacy students, who do a great job of calming you down prior to your interview. Take this opportunity to ask questions and warm up your oral communication skills. Do not worry to much about the “essay” portion as it is just a test of how well you take notes off of a random article that you read. BE SURE to follow all directions provided to you as it is also a test on how well you pay attention to details.

Here are the pre-requisites for USC’s pharmacy program:

Calculus (for science majors)

Statistics (non-business)

Physics w/lab (science/life science majors- thermodynamics & Electromagnetism recommended)

General Biology w/lab (excludes human anatomy & physiology, botany, and microbiology)

Mammalian Physiology w/lab (human preferred-excludes plant, cell and marine physiology)

Microbiology w/lab (fundamentals of microbiology for science majors)

Molecular or Cell Biology(for science majors-one upper division course)

General Chemistry w/lab (for science majors-include inorganic & qualitative analysis)

Organic Chemistry w/lab (for science majors)

Biochemistry (for science majors one upper division course)

Human Behavior (General Psychology or Introductory Sociology)

Microeconomics

For Internationals (holders of foreign US bachelor’s equivalent):

English (expository writing)

Interpersonal Communications or Public Speaking

For specific course equivalencies from your college, please check the forms available from USC’s website.

The Pharm.D. program at USC is a 4 year program. USC is a private school, and our estimated tuition and cost of living for 2009 is approximately $60,000.

The University of Southern California provides students the opportunity to pursue dual degrees in addition to their Doctor of Pharmacy Degree. These include the following:

Pharm.D./Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)

Pharm.D./Juris Doctor(J.D.)

Pharm.D./Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

Pharm.D./Master of Science in Regulatory Science (M.S. Regulatory Science)

Pharm.D./ Master of Science in Gerontology (M.S.G.)

Pharm.D./Graduate Certificate in Gerontology (Gerontology Certificate)

Pharm.D./Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)