5 Ways To Effectively Review For A CSET Exam

Preparing for a CSET test is no joke and cramming for it is unheard of. You must be well aware by now as a teacher, that a certification exam will require thorough memorization, practice, and review and application. When you prepare well head of time, you are able to exhaust all efforts and resources into reviewing for the exam. This is essential because reading through a CSET multiple subjects study guide and taking the subjects practice test are not sufficient when you review, thus you will need all the help you can get to pass the test. So, what do you have to do to prep up for a CSET test?

Memorization

It is a fact that certification exams especially a multiple subjects CSET exam will require plenty of memorization. You just can not browse through a study guide and think that you already know everything you have read. Memorization helps improve your memory and retain the information being studied.

When you review your CSET study guide and other literature, you may want to read the information out loud and repeat it to yourself. Your brain will be able to remember details which are of importance, so when you repeat it over and over again, your brain automatically comprehends that the information being relayed is important.

However, you must always set a proper study time and place for memorization. Clear out an hour or two each day in your active lifestyle and chose a quiet area with minimal distractions where you can memorize. You must also limit the CSET multiple subjects being reviewed each day. After all studying science, mathematics, reading, language, literature, social science, history, human development, physical education and visual and performing arts all at once is simply impossible.

Review

Consistent reviewing is essential when preparing for a CSET multiple subjects exam. You can not memorize everything in just one review and reading. Like anyone, you can quickly forget information that has been memorized after some tome. To avoid this, you must review again after a few days or weeks.

It is also a good idea to take down notes when you study and memorize your CSET study guide. You can also record yourself when reviewing so that you can play back the recording during your free time or before you go to sleep until the day of your CSET multiple subjects test.

Attend Study Groups

There are also study groups in your area that you can participate in when reviewing for a CSET multiple subjects test. People who participate in such groups are serious about prepping up for the CSET test, yet they make it a point to do so in an active and fun way.

As a teacher you must know that having fun when you learn is an effective form of preparation for an exam. Everyone shares tips and ideas on learning which allows you to tackle the different CSET exam content in your guide.

Practice

Another effective way of prepping for the CSET test is by taking a multiple subjects practice test. You can easily find practice tests being offered online and in books. When you attend a study group, you will find yourself participating in practice tests for different CSET subjects.

Just like how study materials such as a CSET multiple subjects study guide are essential during your reviews, practice exams are as essential too. You can visit your university library or local library for practice test literature or you can easily purchase multiple subjects practice test from reliable websites online.

It is imperative that you take advantage of practice tests considering the fact that a multiple subjects CSET exam will also focus on your skills in communicating the information with your students for effective learning and strategizing your teaching skills to accommodate all types of learners in a classroom.

Application

After consistently reviewing your CSET study guide and taking up a multiple subjects practice test, you may want to try applying what you have reviewed inside the classroom. Preparing for the CSET subjects test also involves real application so there is nothing more effective than trying out what you have studied on your students. When you test yourself on the application each day, you become thorough with what you are prepping for. This will help you keep the studied information in your head for the big day and beyond.

What Should Be on the Tombstone of Gifted Education: Part 1 – Invasion of the "Gifted" Snatchers

Every one of us in the pre-retirement set remembers what it was like in school. It was a tiny little microcosm of fragmented social groups. Some groups were popular while others banded together to rebel against the popular crowd. Even inside these groups, further stratification was based on who was interested in school work and who wasn’t. Not that academic success mattered within the group, you were still accepted as a member and given the status you thought you deserved. As we graduated, we drifted from high school groups into college or social groupings and tried our best maintain our status as long as we could. Generally, most of us were successful in life in one way or another and we gave birth to the next generation that would run through the gauntlet until it was repopulated again.

Each generation that has lived through public education has seen fit to allow the cream to rise to the top and take their place as leaders of the perpetuation of the American social and political ideal. The gifted students were given unique and surplus resources to allow them to develop their talents so that they may graduate high school and take their place among their peers at the college honors table. From this table of Phi Beta Kappans and research assistants, it was assumed that the gifted student would maintain their grades and the quality of work necessary to move them into graduate school where they would achieve their academic credential. This would catapult them into the elite of medicine, law, politics, sciences, etc. Here are our leaders! They achieved their goals from the blood, sweat, and tears of their high school teachers.

Let us fast-forward to the 21st century where the number of gifted students has shot up in number like they were on academic steroids. Today’s gifted student is not that different than they were in the 20th century. However, their number and membership has been invaded by the greatest disease that the early 21st century has produced: Equality with a side dose of fairness! If you walk into my employer’s high school as it begins just after Labor Day, you will see a sea of students that have labels attached to them. Some of those labels will say “504”, others will say “SPED”, and quite a few will say “Gifted”. Many of these gifted kids will have had the gifted label pasted on them from the early elementary days and will have carried this with them ever since. However, once you begin working with these kids, the “g” and “I” begin to loosen from the gifted tag. They whine, cry, and complain about how hard your class is and start opening their Ipods while you are trying to teach them. Wait a minute! Are these the same kids that have been gifted the entire time? What happened to their ability to step up on their own and take those extra assignments and research work to build up their futures? You begin to wonder if the really earned those grades or were they simply passed on to you from the previous teacher to get out of their hair.

Yes, in the name of equality and fairness, the gifted class of students has been invaded by the formerly mediocre students who were once content to sit in regular classes and do their nails and discuss the series of plays from Friday night’s football game. As I sit and work with gifted classes these days, I see the cream of the crop (They are always there) working away to achieve their future goals. But, now they must sit in the same classes with the popular set whose parents insisted that they be labeled as gifted and take the higher level classes. Rather than the teacher of the gifted spending quality time educating them to achieve those awe-inspiring goals, the gifted teacher must now spend that resource on those students who do not need to be in the gifted class. Equality has suggested that there should be no class of students above another. Fairness suggests that it is not right to punish those poor mediocre students for doing their nails in class. They should be given the right to be gifted.

Coming up in Part 2: Why There Needs to be a Separate “Gifted” program in All Schools.

Stop Making Special Education Harder Than it Really Is

Really, It’s Not Rocket Science, You Can Do It!

Most parents either don’t attempt to get fully involved in the special education process or are too involved in the technical side of the process. The bottom line is that your child’s education is to prepare them for further education, employment and independent living as deemed by the federal law IDEA.If your child’s program is not preparing them, then it’s time to start working with the school team for change.

Why are you so overwhelmed with the special education process? Your child has a golden ticket call the IEP to give them an individual curriculum to meet their needs for the future. Children in the general curriculum do not have that option.

Here are some tips on making the system work for you:

  • Network with other parents in your district to see what resources are available.
  • Services that are appropriate for your child must relate to preparation for further education, employment, and independent living.
  • Work from the bottom to the top. Meet with the teacher on tweaking program needs before you call in a supervisor.
  • Write everything down! If you are prepared for negotiations, you probably won’t have to negotiate.

Overall, your parent instincts should guide your decisions about your child’s education. If you don’t feel that you child is being serviced appropriately, they probably aren’t. Follow the simple tips above to make special education work for your family. Becoming a leader on your child’s IEP team will truly bring the entire family success.

What Should Be on the Tombstone of Gifted Education? Part 3: Classroom Activities for Gifted Student

In Part 2 of the series, the distribution of gifted programs in school districts was analyzed in terms of the allocation of this resource within a school district. In the vast majority of school districts, gifted students are segregated in dedicated facilities in which they have to apply for entry. While this method has advantages for both children and adults in the c=school setting, the major disadvantage is that students who are truly gifted or highly motivated are filtered out by a variety of statistical factors such as test scores, grades, and age. Not only are statistical factors used but having a dedicated facility opens up the possibility of filtering based on human factors such as race, culture, and gender issues. The best option is to have gifted programs in each school so that many more students who are capable will have the access they need to gifted resources.

One of the worsening factors of modern gifted education is the level and quality of classroom activities available for these students. The modern classroom is not geared toward gifted students but rather to the middle student who is perched on the edge of passing the state test. The second priority in the classroom is the lowest student who contributes to the failing rate of state tests. It is assumed that gifted students will pass state exams so they are at the bottom of the school’s priorities. For those teachers that are allowed to design their own materials, this forces them into a teaching mode that focuses on the middle and low-level students and to virtually ignore gifted or highly motivated students. Since most school districts force teachers to use their materials, the district itself sets the stage for ignoring the needs of the gifted student.

In terms of the individual classroom assignment, gifted students require a higher quality set of goals and objectives to meet. Most assignments are geared toward a lower quality set of objectives which hinge of meeting goals based on lower-level thinking skills. The majority of students are operating at the knowledge, comprehension, and application levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. This forces the assignment created by the teacher or district to be based on simple modes of vocabulary mastery and simple application to prescribed situations. Once this is done, the students and teachers move on to the next assignment. The gifted child, who is in need of further learning at higher levels, is left with an experience that only marginally stimulates their higher potential.

The assignments that are provided to gifted children are not properly designed for their educational needs. They are designed for students who are working at much lower levels on a daily basis. Gifted students require assignment and activities that stimulate their natural abilities to a much higher level of thinking. This is not to say that lower level assignments do not have value to the gifted student, but if the teacher stops at this point, then the gifted child to left with unfulfilled potential.

Coming up: Part 4- The Use of Extracurricular Activities as a Method of Fulfilling Potential.

Tips for Homeschoolers – Start the Year Out Right

As a homeschooler starting a new school year, one of the best things you can do is make sure you start your year out right. This doesn’t mean you have to make a big production or a party. Just remember that it’s a new year and sometimes that’s a great time to make any necessary changes.

Whether your changes are big like a whole new math curriculum or small like changing your schedule, the beginning of a new school year is the best time to start. If you have decided to make some changes, determine which changes you are going to make and then decide what needs to be done to make the changes happen. Get started right away.

If you have been homeschooling for a while, you know what is working and what isn’t. But remember, just because a specific curriculum, game, or schedule worked for another child, it does not mean that it will work for all children. Be sure to make changes that appropriate for your particular child’s learning style as well as to the schedule that best suits your entire family.

Many families use the new year or the new semester as a time to try something new. Maybe you want to set new goals this year or try out a new homeschool group. Just because you make a change to something new doesn’t mean it will be the best fit and you’ll want to stick with it. Don’t be afraid to try something new, you can always change it up again if it isn’t working.

If you just find that you are in a rut and need a change – any change, try out a different teaching style. For instance, if you are a unit study family, try out a box curriculum or if you are a strict schedule person, try out a little unschooling. You might be surprised to see how your family thrives when you mix it up a little.

Maybe you need a new approach, a new attitude, or a new subject to mix things up? Consider adding an internet class or online game to change things up. Start your morning with some exercise or a nature walk. Look into a homeschool group or extra curriculum activities.

Whatever you feel your need are, and no matter when you begin your school year, remember… it’s a new year. Now is the time to make the changes you need to make your homeschool run more smoothly and effectively.

What changes will you be making this year?